Wintersession Arts Offerings

Harvard JAMS! January Arts and Media Seminars: January 19-22

Pursue your creative passion, explore arts and entertainment career options, and learn from leading artists and arts professionals during Wintersession 2016. Registration is closed for all public events, but some seating may be available at the door starting 15 minutes prior to start time. Admission first come, first served, subject to venue capacity.

Three hands-on workshops sponsored by the Office for the Arts Ceramics Program, located at the Ceramics Studio in Allston, are available to undergraduates only: “Printmaking on Clay,” “Handmade Mugs” and “Jewelrysmithing with Silver Clay.” See below for workshop descriptions.

Wednesday-Friday, January 20-22:

Wednesday, January 20, 4-5:30 pm, Fong Auditorium: “Plugging Into Good Stuff and Letting Go of Noise: Some Tips for Staying Sane in a Show Business Life”

Amy Brenneman '86Amy Brenneman ‘86 is an actor, writer and producer whose credits include the ABC police drama series “NYPD Blue” (1993-94), for which she was nominated for two Emmy Awards, and the CBS series “Judging Amy” (1999-2005); currently she is starring in the HBO series “The Leftovers.” Her film credits include “Things You Can Tell By Just Looking at Her” (2000) and “The Jane Austen Book Club” (2007). During this talk/Q&A Brenneman will discuss balancing career and personal life, and managing the ups and downs of working in the entertainment industry.
Open to all Harvard affiliates and the public.

Thursday, January 21, 10 am-3 pm, Director’s Studio, 74 Mt. Auburn Street: “Performing Our Experience: Tools for Creating Original Theater”

Amy Brenneman and Sabrina Peck ’84—a theater director, choreographer, and community-engaged theater artist—are former members of Cornerstone Theater Company, a traveling ensemble that adapts classic plays to reflect local realities. This workshop will guide participants through a wide range of techniques for generating, developing, distilling, shaping and performing their original ideas, drawn from their personal experience. Sabrina Peck’s productions include, among others, “Common Green/Common Ground,” created with community gardeners from Brooklyn, East Village, Harlem and the South Bronx (developed as a visiting artist at NYU Tisch School of the Arts); “Commodities” with commodities pit traders on Wall Street; and “Odakle Ste” with Bosnian Muslim refugees in Croatia.
Enrollment limited to 20 students, undergraduates only.

Thursday, January 21, 1-4:45 pm, Harvard Art Museums: “Arts, Creativity and Medicine”

Can looking at art change the way one sees a patient? Can music be used therapeutically in neurologic disorders? Can reflection and narrative writing enhance empathy? This afternoon series of workshops and discussions led by Harvard Medical School faculty, residents and medical students—who are also practicing artists—will focus on an investigation of creativity and its relationship to medical practice. Sponsored by the Committee on Arts & Humanities at Harvard Medical School.
Enrollment limited to 50 students, undergraduates and graduate students only.

Thursday, January 21, 1-2:30 pm, Sever 113: “A Conversation with Jeanine Tesori”

Jeanine Tesori. PHOTO: Rodolfo Martinez

Jeanine Tesori is the 2015 Tony Award-winning composer of “Fun Home” (which also won a Tony for Best Musical), as well as the musicals “Thoroughly Modern Millie” (2002), “Caroline, or Change” (2004) and “Violet” (1997), which was nominated for seven Drama Desk Awards including Outstanding New Musical, and won the Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Musical, the Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Musical, and a Special Obie Citation for Tesori’s music. Tesori will discuss her career during this conversation/Q&A presented by OFA Leaning From Performers and SpeakEasy Stage Company, which is presenting “Violet” January 9-February 6 at the Calderwood Pavilion in Boston’s South End.
Open to all Harvard affiliates and the public. Registration is closed, but some seating may be available at the door starting 15 minutes prior to start time. Admission first come, first served, subject to venue capacity.

Thursday, January 21, 4-5:30 pm, Fong Auditorium: “Private and Public Storytelling: How to Use Digital and Traditional Technologies for Social Change”

Neal Baer EdM ’79, AM ’82, M ’95Neal Baer EdM ’79, AM ’82, M ’95 is a pediatrician and television writer who combines his passion for medicine and storytelling to challenge audiences' views on a spectrum of social and political topics. His credits include the TV series “Under the Dome,” “ER” and “Law and Order: Special Victims Unit,” and he is the founder of Global Media Center for Social Impact, which uses new media to promote health initiatives around the world. Baer will discuss how compelling stories have the power to transform popular culture and catalyze social change in such areas as health, immigration, racial justice, America’s prison crisis, the environment, LGBT/gender equality, education, reproductive health and rights, and more.
Open to all Harvard affiliates and the public. Registration is closed and event is at capacity, but some seating may be available at the door starting 15 minutes prior to start time. Admission first come, first served, subject to venue capacity.

Thursday, January 21, 7-8:30 pm, Fong Auditorium: “The Men and Women in the Mirror: Reflections on How the Commercial Artist Can and Will Change the World”

Paris Barclay ’79Paris Barclay ’79 is President of the Directors Guild of America, the first African-American and first openly gay President in the history of the Guild. He also served on the Guild’s Western Directors Council and co-chaired the Diversity Task Force, whose mission is to encourage the employment of women and minority directors to networks and studios. A two-time Emmy Award-winning television and film producer, writer and director (“ER,” “The West Wing,” “Glee,” “Lost,” “NYPD Blue,” “The Good Wife”), he executive produced the last season of FX’s drama “Sons of Anarchy” and is working with the network on a new series, “The Bastard Executioner.” Barclay has received three NAACP Image Awards, and in 2014 he was inducted into the Image Awards Hall of Fame. Open to all Harvard affiliates and the public. Registration is closed, but some seating may be available at the door starting 15 minutes prior to start time. Admission first come, first served, subject to venue capacity.

Friday, January 22, 10 am-3 pm, Sever Hall 104: “The Pitch: Selling Your Idea”

If you have a great idea for a TV series, what’s the most effective way to sell it to a network? Neal Baer will guide students through the process of the pitch—making creative choices that make sense for the marketplace. This includes the initial short pitch; identifying possible genres and themes as well as structure and characters; focusing on key elements; and other criteria. Students will be asked to submit short pitches, with one chosen to be developed by the group.
Enrollment limited to 15 students, undergraduates only.

Friday, January 22, 10 am-3 pm, Sever Hall 105: “Director/Producer Seminar for Film and Television”

A director directs, a producer produces; both roles are integral to the making of a film or TV series. But what exactly do they do? What do they have in common, and how do they differ? Paris Barclay will provide students with an understanding of the responsibilities and required skills for successful directing and producing; how each can enhance and inform the other; how creative vs. commercial decisions are made; and who, ultimately, has final say.
Enrollment limited to 15 students, undergraduates only.


Friday, January 22, 3-5 pm, Adams House, B-Entry basement level: “Found Poetry at the Bow & Arrow Press”

Haters gonna hate. Lovers gonna love. Alligators gonna alligate.Come make quick verse at a real working letterpress studio! Conceptual artist and printmaker Ted Ollier will lead this workshop. Using antique lead type, letterpress inks and old-school printing technology, the group will assemble a diverse collection of words and phrases into a literary “exquisite corpse” that everyone can take a turn at printing. All attendees will get at least one copy of this joint creation, and probably many more. Enrollment limited to 15 students, undergraduates only. COURSE FULL.

Friday, January 22, 4-5:30 pm, Fong Auditorium: “A Way with Words”

Nell Scovell ’82—a frequent contributor to Vanity Fair and The New York Times, with TV credits that include "The Simpsons," “Monk," “NCIS," "Late Night with David Letterman" and her own hit series "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch"—says that “what you do with words determines what words do to others; they can be arranged to educate, inspire, and entertain. And you can do all three at once.” Scovell will discuss how to jump between literary genres including journalism, book writing, screenplays, speechwriting and television, each form having its own set of structural rules and stylistic demands. If you are interested in a broad range of writing that includes both fiction and non-fiction, prose and dialogue, this discussion will challenge you to try new genres and expand the way you express yourself.
Open to all Harvard affiliates and the public. Registration is closed, but some seating may be available at the door starting 15 minutes prior to start time. Admission first come, first served, subject to venue capacity.
Read an interview with Scovell on the Harvard Arts blog>

WINTERSESSION 2016 workshops sponsored by Office for the Arts at Harvard Ceramics Program, January 19-22, at the Ceramics Studio, 224 Western Ave., Allston

To register, email Shawn Panepinto by clicking on the Register now! button below.

Tuesday-Friday, January 19-22, 1-4 pm: “Printmaking on Clay”

taught by Salvador Jimenez Flores, Instructor, Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard
A variety of printmaking techniques will be explored as applied to the ceramic medium as a means of personal expression. From the graphic to the painterly, techniques will include traditional printmaking techniques such as mono-printing, silk screening and stenciling onto plaster slabs to use with clay rather than the traditional paper and press. Instructor Salvador Jimenez Flores received his MFA, Kendall College of Art and Design, Grand Rapids, MI. BA of Applied Arts in Graphic Design, Robert Morris University, Chicago, IL. Born and raised in Jamay in Jalisco, México, and since coming to the United States, Jiménez has contributed to the Midwest art scene by producing a mixture of socially conscious installations, public art, and studio-based art. Enrollment limited to 15 Harvard students, priority is to undergraduates.

Tuesday-Thursday, January 19 – 21, 1-4 pm: “Adornment: Basic Jewelrysmithing with Silver Clay”

taught by Shawn Panepinto, Director of Operations and Instructor, Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard
Ceramics take shape in many forms. It can be all earth and minerals, or even contain silver. In this workshop, students will learn how to sculpt silver clay—a unique combination of ceramic material, binders and silver that, after firing, leave only silver behind. Students can sculpt anything from small figures to necklace pendants. Techniques for creating pendants, earrings and beads will be explored. Instructor Shawn Panepinto received her Diploma in Ceramics and Painting from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and a BA from Ridgewood College of Art, Ridgewood, NJ, in drawing, painting and graphic design. Her work has been featured at the Fuller Craft Museum as well as other national venues. Enrollment limited to 12 Harvard students, priority is to undergraduates.

Tuesday-Friday, January 19-22, 10 am-1 pm: “Handmade Mugs”

taught by Kyla Toomey, Instructor, Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard
Whether it is for morning coffee, noon soup, or evening hot chocolate, if you want to exchange the Styrofoam and paper versions for a handmade, ceramic mug, this workshop for students of all levels is for you. Along with the learning the ways of the wheel, you will acquire basic skills in wedging, centering or forming basic shapes—like a mug! Instruction will be provided January 19, 20 and 22, with a supervised “open studio” on the 21st. Instructor Kyla Toomey received her MFA from Ohio State University in Columbus, OH and a BFA from Alfred University in Alfred, NY. She has been a Visiting Professor at Gettysburg College and Kansas City University prior to joining the teaching staff at the Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard. Enrollment limited to 15 Harvard students; priority is to undergraduates.

For more information visit the Office of Student Life Wintersession webpage, or call 617.495.8676.

Wintersession offerings from Arts @ 29 Garden: Jan. 16-22

ARCHITECTURE | PUBLIC ART*  | THEATER

Friday, January 15, 5 PM: Optional welcome reception and pizza dinner.
Saturday, January 16-Friday, January 22, 2016, 10 AM-5 PM (with a midday lunch break): intensives in session. The intensives will NOT meet on Sunday, January 17 and Monday, January 18.
*Please note: Public Art intensive runs Tuesday, January 19-Saturday, January 23.

Questions? Contact Bess: paupeck@fas