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Feb 16

New Voices Lecture with Judd Schiffman

5:30pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

Ceramics Studio - 224 Western Avenue, Allston, MA 02134

Presented by Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard

The “New Voices Lectures” are an on-going series highlighting some of the most talented emerging artists utilizing the ceramic medium in the field of contemporary art. 

Join us for a lecture by Judd Schiffman as we welcome him back to the Boston area after receiving his Masters of Fine Arts in Ceramics from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Feb 22

Visiting Artist Lecture with Janna Longacre

5:30pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

Ceramics Studio - 224 Western Avenue, Allston, MA 02134

Presented by Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard

Join us in welcoming Professor Janna Longacre for a lecture on her work and career.  Janna joins the Ceramics Program this semester as a Visiting Critic in the class "Input/Output". As a sculptor and installation artist, Janna identifies herself as a narrative artist, using clay/ceramics with other manufactured and found materials to tell abstract stories. Her own personal portfolio also includes tableware design solutions and mixed media sculpture using neon.  

Mar 12

Visiting Artist Workshop with Nick Joerling

Mar 12, 10:00am to Mar 13, 5:00pm

Location: 

Ceramics Studio - 224 Western Avenue, Allston, MA 02134

Presented by Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard

This workshop is free to Harvard students. The fee for this two-day, hands-on workshop is $275.00 for those not enrolled in a course, $225.00 for those enrolled in a course. To register, download our registration form here or email Shawn Panepinto at panepint@fas.harvard.edu. Questions? Email Kathy King at kking@fas.harvard.edu.

Workshop Description - Pots/Possibilities with Nick Joerling
Course Description: Beginning with round pots coming from the wheel, we'll push, cut, coax, and stretch those form. Why alter pots? Tom Spleth nicely observed, "As work departs from thrown forms that typically refers to pots and pottery, it gains the ability to describe forms in nature, suggest the vulnerability of the figure, and express the asymmetry found in human experience." Our focus will be on utilitarian pots but we'll take some liberties with that notion too. Various ways of making handles, lids, and spouts will be explored.

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